What is Vaginal Mesh Removal

Vaginal mesh has established itself as the primary therapy for complications that have compromised pelvic floor tissue. As such, it is often used in the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and to repair damaged tissue after child birth. Of particular concern, however, are reports that these devices may erode through the vaginal wall and perforate local organs, causing serious and potentially life-threatening injuries or infections. Therefore, those that have experienced significant complications may need revision surgery consisting of vaginal mesh removal to mitigate complications.

Otherwise known as a bladder sling, for its resemblance to that of a hammock, vaginal mesh its typically made up of either metallic or polymeric screens. The screen itself is used as a reinforcement in the presence of compromised bone and tissue on the pelvic floor. Its integration into compromised tissue prevents the further displacement of local organs. Typically, vaginal mesh is used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence. However, traumatic injuries resulting from childbirth may also require vaginal mesh intervention.

Unfortunately, the rate in which transvaginal mesh products experience some form of failure is unacceptably high. Common, yet serious, complications are often the result of mesh erosion and bowel perforation. Subsequent failure associated with transvaginal mesh products may coincide with the development of a variety of side effects that vary in their severity. Mesh erosion may result in life-threatening infections or further harm to local tissue and organs. Therefore, vaginal mesh removal may be required to mitigate any further complications. Revision surgery is often costly and never guaranteed to alleviate the problem.

Vaginal Mesh Complications

Vaginal mesh removal may be required if the recipient experiences any of the following:

  • Organ perforation
  • Bleeding episodes (hemorrhage & hematoma
  • Pain
  • Infection
  • Dyspareunia
  • Revision surgery
  • Transvaginal mesh exposure
  • Mesh erosion into bladder or rectum

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